The Bureau of Economic Geology The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences
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December 2012

Austin is known nationally as one of the best communities in the country in which to live and work. With its eclectic culture, beautiful vistas, music scene, and friendly people, Austin is unique among the nation’s major job markets. Now an Austin American-Statesman survey of 20,000 area employees has named the Bureau of Economic Geology as one of a handful of “Top Workplaces” in the city for 2012. 

Dr. Scott Tinker, Director, reacted to the news: “I would like to extend my sincere congratulations to all of the talented scientists, engineers, students, staff, and management whose efforts have made UT’s Bureau of Economic Geology one of the top workplaces in Austin,” he said. “This honor is a tribute to each of them and their tremendous contributions to the Bureau’s success.” Employers making the list were nominated by their employees.

With over 200 people on its staff and a broad reputation as a world leader in energy and environmental research, the Bureau of Economic Geology is the oldest and second-largest research unit at The University of Texas at Austin.

The Austin American-Statesman survey was conducted by World Dynamics and included questions concerning employers’ leadership direction, training, inclusion, pay, and benefits. The Bureau of Economic Geology was named one of Austin’s Top Workplaces in the “small business” category. 



The Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC) hosted its 7th Biannual All-Projects Review at Halliburton's beautiful new corporate offices in Houston, November 14–15. More than 140 students, professors, and industry members from around the world gathered for this 2-day event at the new Life Center Building at the center of Halliburton's large campus. In addition to the 35 technical presentations were a number of topical poster sessions, guided tours of the facility, and an offsite reception. After Halliburton's keynote, the event kicked off with progress reports from the nanomaterial sensor projects, which now include smart tracers, reservoir reporters, payload delivery systems, and options for clocking and improving EOR. Then Carla Thomas introduced the oil industry's first coordinated program to test nanoparticle mobility using standard test materials and rigorous protocols, and she presented early results using AEC-developed nanosensors. Thursday morning Mohsen Ahmadian detailed how the AEC is preparing for its first field test, and he then introduced researchers who are synthesizing, characterizing, and modeling magnetic, acoustic, and dielectric nanoparticles that will change the future of geophysical interrogation. Finally, David Chapman outlined the AEC's microfabricated-sensor development strategy, followed by research teams who are creating new micro- and nanosensors and novel high-temperature power sources, while integrating all into a packaged prototyping platform for testing. Next year's invitation-only events will be held May 29–30, 2013, at Schlumberger's Doll Research Center in Boston and November 20–21, 2013 at Shell's Westhollow Technology Center.



On December 11, Clint Moore visited the Bureau to examine Tuscaloosa Marine Shale (TMS) core from the Sun # 1 Spinks well, Pike County, Mississippi. The core was apparently the first TMS core ever cut (1972). Clint's late father, Alfred C. Moore, had promoted the play in the 1970's and had designed the coring program, which recovered more than 300 ft of core, with the lower 100 ft in the key TMS shale oil zone. Clint says his father had sent him to examine the core when he was a geology student. He had not seen it again for several decades until this visit. The lower zone of the core is now the target zone pursued by several operators in the area, utilizing multistage hydraulic-fracture programs in horizontal wells. Left to right in photo: Clint Moore, Kyle Spezia (University of Louisiana Lafayette), the Bureau's Jiemin Lu, and Kirk Barrell (Amelia Resources).

The Bureau welcomes new administrative associate Kim LaValley. A life-long Longhorn, Kim has a strong background in Education and Development. She spent almost a decade in public education, focusing on one of her greatest passions, early literacy. Her desire for teaching and learning led her back to study at UT. In 2003, she completed her educational diagnostician certificate and was awarded her Master's in Education in Learning Disabilities and Behavior Disorders. Kim previously served as Executive Administrative Assistant for UT's Office of Corporate Development. Her new responsibilities will be equally challenging: Kim will manage the Bureau's telephone services, track staff office assignments, and will provide support for Bureau travel and vehicles.


 

 

 
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