The Bureau of Economic Geology The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences
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November 2014


The Texas Consortium for Computational Seismology (TCCS) and its principal investigator, Sergey Fomel, made a strong impact on the recent Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Annual Meeting in Denver. Fomel and his students and TCCS collaborators gave 25 presentations on topics ranging from seismic acquisition to seismic interpretation. Fomel also made an invited presentation in the special session "Recent Advances and the Road Ahead." He spoke about seismic imaging in the time domain (the method of prestack time migration), which is widely used in seismic exploration but often neglected by research scientists. Fomel noted that recent research reveals surprising properties of time migration, which can be explored further to make breakthrough improvements. In his popular blog, Evan Bianco of Agile Geoscience subsequently wrote, “It was joy to listen to Sergey describe these observations through what he called beautiful equations: ‘the beautiful part about this equation is that it has no parameters,’ or ‘the beauty of this equation is that it does not contain velocity,’ and so on. Mad respect.” Fomel’s TCCS consortium also recently conducted its second biannual research meeting in Austin November 3–4. More than 50 members viewed 19 research presentations by TCCS staff and invited speakers, including professors Lexing Ying (Stanford University) and Jiubing Cheng (Tongji University).



Shirley Dutton accepts her award from GCSSEPM President Carl Fiduk.
Shirley Dutton accepts her award from GCSSEPM President Carl Fiduk.

The Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies (GCAGS) recently held its 64th Annual Convention in Lafayette, Louisiana, and Bureau of Economic Geology researchers were on hand to receive two distinguished honors. Shirley Dutton received the 2014 Doris Malkin Curtis Medal from the Gulf Coast Section of the Society for Sedimentary Geology (GCSSEPM).Bureau Senior Research Scientists Jerry Lucia (left) and Bob Loucks The Curtis Medal recognizes geologists for their career contributions in the development of new concepts for understanding the geology of the Gulf of Mexico basin and other basins globally. Additionally, the Bureau’s Jerry Lucia and Bob Loucks were honored with the GCAGS Journal President’s Award for Outstanding Paper for “Micropores in Carbonate Mud: Early Development and Petrophysics.” These are two of the latest examples of how Bureau of Economic Geology researchers continue to earn notable accolades for impactful science and dedicated service.


There's an old Texas saying about some out-of-the-way spots that goes, "You just have to be going there to get there." The Bureau of Economic Geology's Devine Test Site is definitely one of those places. Located not too far from Devine, Texas, southwest of San Antonio, the Devine Test Site is a tremendously valuable resource for researchers and companies interested in experiments investigating real-world downhole characteristics. Although the casual observer might dismiss this 100 acre tract, overgrown with mesquite trees and grazed by longhorn cattle, as simple ranchland, closer examination finds nine well heads and strong evidence of recent research activity. These wells range from 1,500 to 3,000 feet deep, and pass through formations generally characteristic of coastal Texas geology. For several years, Bob Hardage, principal investigator of the Bureau's Exploration Geophysical Laboratory (EGL), has overseen activity at the Site and conducted the EGL's multicomponent seismic research within and between its wells. Hardage also cultivates companies to test their new seismic tools and other devices in a unique environment, and at minimal cost: A $5,000 fee will allow industry the use of the Devine Test Site wells and other facilities to conduct research and development for up to three months, and to keep the data gathered proprietary for up to two years. Other Bureau researchers frequently use the Site. Recently, Changbing Yang of the Gulf Coast Carbon Center measured the extent of the groundwater table at the Test Site in preparation to use it for the testing and development of a new CO2 sensor. For more information or to reserve the Devine Test Site, please contact Sara Clough.






 
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