The Bureau of Economic Geology The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences
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October 2014

Director Scott Tinker speaks at the Bureau retreat
Diversity is a critical element underpinning the Bureau of Economic Geology's success, and its many benefits were on broad display at the organization's recent Retreat. Well over 100 researchers and staff—bringing different backgrounds, cultures, disciplines, and perspectives to theDaniel Ortuño takes a swing at golf table—came together for a day of opinion-sharing, with the unifying objective of setting the course for the Bureau's ventures for years to come. The Retreat was held at Austin's new Top Golf facility and opened with Director Scott W. Tinker's welcome, which underlined the need for and importance of the day's discussions. The opening informational sessions updated those present on vital Bureau initiatives. That afternoon, attendees rolled up their sleeves and actively participated in insightful discussions covering topics ranging from a Strengths/
Weaknesses/ Opportunities/Threats analysis, to an examination of the recruitment and retention of talent, to the new Marketing and Communication Plan. The outcome of this lively interplay of ideas will serve as the basis for a new Bureau Strategic Plan. The day concluded with laughter and camaraderie as Bureau members demonstrated their golfing skills (or lack thereof) and traded stories while enjoying the energetic ambience of the Top Golf facility.


Seay Nance (right) discusses research results with Shell Manager of Unconventional Gas and Tight Oil Claudia Hackbarth and BEG Associate Director of Energy Eric Potter
The Quantitative Clastics Laboratory (QCL) convened its annual review meeting September 15th in Grand Junction, Colorado, to discuss the results of the fluvial-deltaic-shallow marine (FDSM) research program. Researchers presented talks discussing QCL's broad research program in FDSM depositional systems, including river-, wave-, and tide- dominated systems, including deposits of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway in the Schrader Bluff and Prince Creek formations in northern Alaska. Also discussed were processes and emplacement of shelf sands, incised surfaces, and modeling of FDSM depositional systems. This was followed on September 16 by a three-day field course examining the nature of wave-dominated, tide-dominated, and mixed fluvial-wave-tide dominated shorelines, deltas, and associated incised valleys from Green River, Utah, to Rangley, Colorado. The group spent time in the field examining and comparing the wave- and storm-dominated systems of the Blackhawk Formation, the tide- and wave-dominated systems of the Sego Formation, and the mixed fluvial-wave-tide dominated systems of the Loyd Formation.
Seay Nance (right) discusses research results with Shell Manager of Unconventional Gas and Tight Oil Claudia Hackbarth and BEG Associate Director of Energy Eric Potter





 
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