The Bureau of Economic Geology The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences
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July 2014

original core and cuttings metadata
Managing what may be the world's largest archive of rock material is a sizeable task, but making it accessible to the world can be equally challenging. With most of the samples collected and documented before the era of digital data storage, much of the metadata consists of handwritten index cards or other paper documents. To better facilitate viewing of the cores and provide easy access to accurate information, Bureau Research Scientist Associate Beverly DeJarnett is working with Woodlands students Bradley Schmidt and Nathan Scheffe at the Bureau's Houston Research Center to migrate the information to a centralized log and core database. Even with modern recognition software, the human mind is still the computer best able to decode the vast and variant quantity of information, and much of the data is being entered by hand. The program is being funded by the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program, administered through the United States Geological Survey (USGS).
Beverly DeJarnett (inset), Bradley Schmidt, and Nathan Scheffe


Greg Frébourg addresses students during GeoFORCE field tripTrekking across the American Southwest with forty 10th-grade students may not be the usual ambition of a mudrock sedimentologist, but Bureau Research Associate Greg Frébourg can describe his second tour as a GeoFORCE instructor with a single, emphatic word: "Awesome." The experience that stands out most for Frébourg is not immersion in 2 billion years of vivid geologic history in the Grand Canyon, or standing on the rim of the Barringer meteor crater, or even rafting the Colorado River beneath Glenn Canyon. Rather, it's the infectious passion for knowledge that his students exhibit at every turn, whether in an after-dinner lecture, or in the field trying to explain the seemingly unexplainable—like Marble Canyon's Natural Balanced Rock. For the students, far removed from their small Southwest Texas towns, it's an opportunity to quench their thirst for knowledge among some of the world's most breathtaking vistas. For GeoFORCE instructors like Frébourg, it's a simple affirmation of their own passion for geology and love for learning.
GeoFORCE students pose beneath Natural Balanced Rock in Arizona's Marble Canyon



 
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