The Bureau of Economic Geology The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences
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January 2016
Operator taking core samples at the site of the Bureau's new Core Research Building Core: Unquestionably, the Bureau’s greatest material asset. We scratch it, spray it, slice it—even lick it!—to determine its unique properties. We may possess more rock core than anyone in the world, and we undoubtedly conduct the best research on core of any geological institution. So, when a crew rolled up with a drilling rig and began coring in the Bureau’s front yard, it was an interesting turn of events, to say the least. Why were they coring right outside of the Core Research Center? They, too, were studying rocks—determining the ability of the rocks underlying the site for the Bureau’s new Core Research Building to withstand the weight of the construction. “We’re well into the process for eventually breaking ground and getting this building built,” said Jay Kipper, associate director of the Bureau. “When it’s finished, it’ll be a great place for our researchers to study rock samples, and we’re looking for support to install a rooftop terrace that will be able to host Bureau events.” To learn more about how you can be a partner in the creation of the Core Research Building, its rooftop terrace, and the adjacent scenic rock garden, please contact Jay Kipper.

The Bureaus's new Core Research Building (foreground left)

Katherine Romanak meets with climate delegates from around the world at the exhibit booth on carbon sequestration.The recent COP21 United Nations Conference on Climate Change held in Paris provided a clear measure of worldwide interest in climate-change technologies like Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). The conference had more than 50,000 participants, including 25,000 official delegates from government, intergovernmental organizations, UN agencies, and NGO’s. As world interest in climate-change technologies grows, so does the Bureau’s reach and recognition as a historic leader in CCS and capacity development. Representing the Bureau’s Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC), Research Scientist Katherine Romanak presented “Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Achievements and Opportunities for Developing Country Involvement.Katherine Romanak at COP21The session sought to continue efforts to create active collaborations in technology transfer, especially among economically emerging societies. Said Romanak, “We saw a 30-fold increase in CCS interest since COP17 in Durban in 2011. With more than 200 in attendance and standing room only, we also had a lot of positive and engaging questions that showed an increased level of understanding by the stakeholders.” The conference generated strong interest in collaboration from countries such as Nigeria, Thailand, Ghana, and Russia. The event also provided an opportunity to promote the Bureau’s hosting of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum’s planned Capacity Building Workshop on Sub-Seabed Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide, scheduled for April of 2016.



On Friday, January 22, the Jackson School of Geosciences will celebrate the incredible legacy of Jack and Katie Jackson and the 10th anniversary of the formation of the school, which brought together The University of Texas at Austin’s Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Geological Sciences, and Institute for Geophysics to fulfill the Jacksons’ vision of creating one of the most dynamic schools of geosciences in the world.

To celebrate, the Jackson School will be hosting a research symposium organized around Jack Jackson’s vision that the school should conduct research and educate young people “in the subjects of geology; geophysics; energy, mineral and water resources; and broad areas of the earth sciences, including the Earth’s environment.” Panels of faculty, researchers, and students will explore these areas in depth throughout the day. Panel keynote speakers include:

The Jackson School will welcome renowned academics, researchers, and industry leaders, including University President Greg Fenves (NAE), former University presidents Larry Faulkner and Peter Flawn (NAE), and inaugural Dean Bill Fisher (NAE). Former UNOCAL CEO and Jackson School alumnus Chuck Williamson will help wrap up the day. An added treat will be a panel of individuals, dubbed “The Jackson Five” by Mr. Jackson himself, who will reminisce about the formation of the school and Jack’s vision. The celebration will kick off at 9:00 a.m. in the Student Activity Center Ballroom on the UT-Austin Main Campus.

For more information, please contact Mark W. Blount, External Affairs, Bureau of Economic Geology.



 
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