Updated:
November 10, 2006

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November 2006

Bureau research scientist Bill Ambrose has been appointed to serve as the Vice Chair for the AAPG Astrogeology Committee for a term ending June 30, 2009. Bill will be working with Committee Chairman Harrison H. Schmitt (of Apollo 17 fame) to develop committee objectives, design and implement projects, and balance workloads. Bill is active in planetary geology and recently presented his paper “First-order

relationships between lunar crater morphology, degree of degradation, and relative age: the crater degradation index" at the 2006 Annual AAPG Convention in Houston, Texas. 11/09/06

Bureau scientist Mark Holtz has been invited to join a panel at the Coal Gasification Summit in Denver on Monday, November 13. The panel will discuss work from sequestration pilot sites in the U.S., and Mark will be representing the Gulf Coast Carbon Center and the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration. The meeting will be held at the Sheraton Denver West. 11/06/06

BEG Geologist Dr. Peter Eichhubl will present this week's technical seminar. Titled "Localization of Deformation in Granular and Porous Media," the talk will explore the significance of compaction localization on porosity evolution of sandstone during burial, cementation and deformation, and the mechanics of deformation bands. The seminar will take place at 8:30 a.m., Friday, November 10. [abstract] 10/30/06


Attendance was 130 strong, attendees representing 20 companies, at the Applied Geodynamics Laboratory’s 19th annual Industrial Associates meeting, which was held in Austin November 2 and 3. AGL members José Dirkzwager, Tim Dooley, Mike Hudec, and Martin Jackson presented 15 talks over the 1½ -day meeting, covering topics that ranged from submarine thrusts in the Gulf of Mexico to salt canopies in the Canadian Arctic. Guest speakers Joe Cartwright (Cardiff University, Wales), Teunis Heyn (BP), and Patricia Montoya (Anadarko) presented additional material that was based on seismic interpretations in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Gulf of Mexico. The finale of the meeting was a tour of AGL’s physical modeling facilities, during which delegates were presented an overview of the technology that goes into simulating salt structures in the lab and were given the opportunity to watch an actively deforming model. 11/03/06

Ruarri Day-Stirrat, a recent arrival from England, has joined Shirley Dutton’s team in studying deep-shelf gas. Before arriving at the Bureau, Ruarri worked as a consultant to Shell, BP, ChevronTexaco, and various universities. He is familiar with a wide range of computer programs suitable for geological research, including Maturity Modeling using Genesis 4.8®, High-Resolution X-ray Texture Goniometry (HRXTG), SEM (including backscattered mode, EDX), TEM (including EDX for

chemistry), and XRD (of shales, muds, and clays oriented and random preparations). In addition to his myriad new Bureau duties, Ruarri is an avid cyclist. 11/03/06

Guest Speaker Dr. Bruce Hart of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, will present a special seminar Tuesday, Novermber 7, at 11:00am in the Bureau's Main Conference Room. The talk is titled Curvature for Stratigraphic and Structural Interpretation, and will examine the use of curvature analysis to study structural and stratigraphic features in a variety of settings. [abstract] 11/03/06

Jeannie Farahnak is the new Administrative Associate under Jean Abernathy in the Administration area. A 2005 Cum Laude graduate in Architecture from Texas Tech, Jeannie also has an Associate of Science degree from Kilgore College. Jeannie is interested in outreach, having volunteered to provide basic parenting education under the auspices of the Golden Key Honor Society, of which she is a member. She also admits to being

one of the invaders inside a Trojan horse that she designed and constructed in order to promote a 24-hour reading of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey for the Lubbock Coalition for Literacy. Among other things, Jeannie works on payroll, vacation/sick leave, and mileage logs for Bureau vehicles. 11/02/06

Leonel Gomez is in the final stages of finishing his dissertation on spatial arrangement of fractures in the context of structural diagenesis. Leonel, along with his advisor Dr. Randall Marrett and collaborator Dr. Julia Gale of BEG, have made a significant breakthrough by devising a new method to characterize the spatial arrangement of fractures. A chapter of Leonel’s dissertation is one of a set of three papers that are in press in the Journal of

Structural Geology. Some of the methods that Leonel developed to collect and process his data were published earlier this year (Gomez and Laubach, 2006, Journal of Structural Geology). Leonel expects to graduate this semester, then move to the research lab at Exxon. 11/01/06


The Structural Diagenesis Research Program at the Jackson School has been awarded more than $750,000 of funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) to continue its award-winning research for another 3 years. The program, which began with support from the Jackson School and a matching BES grant, won praise early on, earning a "Best University Research" award from DOE in 2004, as well as distinguished lecture tours and other honors. Steve Laubach, lead principal investigator on the project, collaborates with co-PI's Peter Eichhubl (BEG), Rob Lander and Linda Bonnell (BEG Research Fellows), Jon Olson (Petroleum Engineering), and Randy Marrett (Geological Sciences). Laubach sees great potential for the program: "The best science is yet to come in this area. There are many exciting research leads with important societal implications." The research strives to further understanding of how fracture and fault growth and chemical diagenetic processes interact to govern the attributes of structures in the Earth. To learn more about the program, click here. 11/01/06