Listen to the full interview here:
http://www.texasstandard.org/stories/experts-say-government-leadership-technology-and-individual-action-are-key-to-fighting-climate-change/

On December 14, 2018 Katherine Romanak was interviewed by the Texas Standard and broadcast on Texas public radio for a story on the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP24) and what governments, businesses, and people can do about the climate.

For the past two weeks, leaders from some 200 countries met in Poland for the UNFCCC COP24 conference and are “still struggling with what exactly to do about the climate getting warmer. What are governments, businesses, people supposed to do?” asks the Texas Standard.

To answer this Texas Standard producers assembled an expert panel including: Brady Dennis, a reporter for the Washington Post focusing on the environment and public health issues and who’s currently in Poland for the climate conference; Justin Penn, lead researcher in chemical and oceanography from the University of Washington in Seattle; and Katherine Romanak, research scientist at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin who spoke at the conference last week.

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  • Susan Hovorka, a senior research scientist at The University of Texas at Austin, has won the Greenman Award for her significant contributions to the development of greenhouse gas control technologies.

    “I am honored to receive this award in recognition of my team’s work,” Hovorka said. “Joining the ranks of the prestigious individuals who have won this in the past illustrates the overall success of our work in greenhouse gas mitigation.”

    She received the award last week at the 14th annual Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies (GHGT) conference in Melbourne, Australia.

    The award was presented to Hovorka by Kelly Thambimuthu, a scientist who worked on the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The panel, along with former Vice President Al Gore, was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

    “Hovorka’s work in carbon dioxide storage has advanced the field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) immeasurably,” said Thambimuthu. “Most priceless of all, she has been a mentor and inspiration to the CCS students she’s advised, and an internationally-influential leader to many technical research teams.”

    Only 12 people have received the Greenman Award since its inception in 1996, including this year’s winners.

    [Read this story on the AAAS EurekaAlert! and the Jackson School of Geosciences websites.]

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