GCCC researchers aren’t just talented scientists, they are incredible artists too. In collaboration with the Centers for Subsurface Energy SecurityHilary Olson teamed up with Victoria Osborne, Kim Gilbert, and Jeffery Clement Olson to create this sumptuous data-rich artwork. The graphic integrated into the art shows the ability of stored CO2 to dissolve in brines of various chemical compositions. The accompanying poem, As Above, So Below, recounts the shared quest of scientists and artists to unlock the universe’s magic.

The entry won second place in the DOE’s Poetry of Science Contest, which challenged entrants to convey the wonder of science using poetry inspired by a scientific image. Now, Team CFSES is competing for the People’s Choice Award. Take a look at all the gorgeous and inspiring poetry and artwork in the competition, then help catapult CCS to the top with your vote!

  • COP20  side event team in Lima Peru. Left to right: Mike Monea, Saskpower: Vanessa Nunez-Lopez BEG: Tim Dixon, IEAGHG: Katherine Romanak, BEG: Paulo Negrais Carneiro Seabra, Petrobras
    COP20 side event team in Lima Peru. Left to right: Mike Monea, Saskpower: Vanessa Nunez-Lopez BEG: Tim Dixon, IEAGHG: Katherine Romanak, BEG: Paulo Negrais Carneiro Seabra, Petrobras

    In Lima, Peru at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties (UNFCCC COP) 20 last week, GCCC’s Vanessa Nunez-Lopez and Katherine Romanak built on CCS momentum by hosting an information booth and an official side event with IEAGHG titled “New large-scale carbon capture and storage projects operating in the Americas.”

    The event showed the viability of CCS as a mitigation tool. Projects in various modes of deployment were highlighted including a summary of USA projects (emphasizing the role of the GCCC), the start of the Boundary Dam project in Saskatchewan, Canada, and Petrobras’ strategies for using CCS to manage the CO2 co-produced with Pre-salt hydrocarbons.

    GCCC also presented information about an initiative for a global collaboration on an offshore demonstration project spearheaded by both the GCCC and the U.S. Department of Energy through the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum. IEAGHG summarized the significance of these projects in light of the anticipated climate agreement to be negotiated in Paris in 2015.

    The GCCC/IEAGHG-hosted event was well-attended and well received. One Washington DC-based attendee summarized the impact of the discussions, “I didn’t believe CCS could work but now I see that it can, because you are actually doing it.”

    Presentations given at the side event can be viewed here:

    New Large-scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Projects Operating in the Americas
    SaskPower CCS Conference of the Parties
    Petrobras’ Offshore CO2 Management – Pre-salt development management
    USA large scale onshore projects/Global offshore demonstration project

    GCCC’s first technical input to the UNFCCC was in 2011 when we presented research on groundwater protection and monitoring at both a UNFCCC workshop held in Abu Dhabi, UAE and at a side event at COP 17 in Durban, South Africa. Both events were designed to inform policy-makers about the latest CCS research relevant to negotiations on whether CCS should be included in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) for developing countries. GCCC technical input contributed to inclusion of CCS in the CDM which has set the stage for CCS to be recognized in other UNFCCC mechanisms including the finance mechanism of the Green Climate Fund, which recently reached a total of $10 billion in pledges.

    Katherine Romanak and Vanessa Nunez Lopez at the UNFCCC climate talks.


  • by Juli Berwald

    tweetIn 2006, the very first tweet was sent. It read, “just setting up my twttr.” That same year, the Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC), along with many partners, was starting an effort you could argue was even more ambitious. It would provide key information about one of the most feasible technologies we currently have available to mitigate climate change. The GCCC was in the planning stages of the most densely observed field study of carbon capture and sequestration in the United States. Located at Cranfield Field, Mississippi, no other sequestration project aimed to incorporate as many different geological and technical measurements at a single storage site.

    special section of the October issue of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control is dedicated to documenting the seven years of research on CCS at Cranfield. The section is a mid-project overview and assessment of the CCS fieldwork, dense data collection, and analysis that still continues there. The section consists of sixteen papers authored by GCCC staff and their colleagues. It opens with a discussion of the Cranfield project design and covers risk assessment, characterization, injection and production activities, as well as monitoring techniques and modeling. The volume was guest-edited by Susan Hovorka, Tip Meckel and JP Nicot.

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