The Gulf Coasmarakesht Carbon Center will host the only official UNFCCC side event devoted entirely to CCS at COP-22 in Marrakech, Morocco November 7-18, 2016. The event is hosted in collaboration with IEAGHG, Carbon Capture and Storage Association (CCSA), and CO2GeoNet, and will focus on “Opportunities for Africa in Carbon Capture and Storage”.

In addition to Katherine Romanak from the GCCC, Tim Dixon from IEAGHG, and Ton Wildenborg from CO2GeoNet, speakers will include Mike Monea from the newly-formed International CCS Knowledge Centre (an initiative of BHP Billiton and SaskPower), Felicia Chinwe Mogo from Nigeria, Joseph Essandoh-Yeddu from Ghana, and Tony Surridge from South Africa.

The side event aims to show that CCS is a demonstrated technology for achieving emission reductions under the Paris Agreement. Progress towards CCS deployment in Africa and global CCS developments relevant for Africa, onshore and offshore will be presented. Steps for CCS pilot project development and new opportunities for technology transfer will be outlined.

The side event will be held Tuesday November 8 from 11:30-13:00 UTC in the Mediterranean room for those attending the COP. For those who are not attending, the session can be viewed in real-time (local standard Morocco time) by using this link.

 

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    The R/V Brooks-McCall, approximately 50 m in length, tows the P-cable system in October 2013 in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo courtesy of TDI-Brooks International.

    The Gulf Coast Carbon Center is delighted to have received funding for a new project that will improve monitoring of carbon storage in offshore reservoirs. Tip Meckel is the PI on a $2.5 M award under DOE’s Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration Crosscut initiative to deploy and validate a novel, ultrahigh resolution 3D marine seismic technology at the Tomakomai carbon storage site in Japan.

    The technology, known as the P-cable because it is towed perpendicular to the direction of a ship’s track, has been used successfully off of the Texas coast to evaluate and characterize storage units with exceptional spatial resolution. Trailing long streamers equipped with seismic receivers in tight formation, the P-cable provides high resolution 3D seismic imagery in a region extending from the seafloor down to about 1500 meters. The detailed data can be used to infer the history of fluid migration, which is key to ensuring that carbon dioxide is stored where it will not leak. The effort was performed as part of the GCCC’s Offshore Miocene Project.

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    Schematic of the P-cable system

    With the new funding, the P-cable will be used to evaluate storage units at the Tomakomai Site, a fully developed carbon capture and storage project offshore from the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido. The project seeks to test feasibility, and if favorable, deploy the P-cable to demonstrate significantly improved spatial resolution and accuracy over a commercially meaningful offshore area. Such high-quality and high-resolution data should decrease both cost and uncertainty in measurements supporting monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) in the subsea environment.

    “This is  an excellent method for GCCC and the US program to advance our expertise in storage in the near-offshore setting via international collaboration with the unique project in Japan,” said Susan Hovorka, GCCC’s Primary Investigator.

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    The Gulf Coast Carbon Center was delighted to host the first International Workshop on Offshore Geologic CO2 Storage. GCCC’s Katherine Romanak was instrumental in organizing the workshop with IEAGHG’s Tim Dixon, who is currently an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at BEG.

    Dixon emphasized the value of bringing together an international contingent to discuss carbon storage in offshore reservoirs. “Over 50 experts from 13 countries came together in a common recognition that there is a nexus of interests and needs converging in progressing CCS offshore, and that momentum is being created towards international collaborations not just in knowledge-sharing but towards pilot and demonstration projects.”

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    The workshop evolved as an outgrowth of BEG’s interaction with the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum and IEAGHG. In addition, Tony Surridge from the South African National Energy Development Institute was a co-host.

    IMG_5411The workshop made a notable historical mark as the first carbon sequestration-related effort to take advantage of the new financial instruments provided by the United Nation’s Climate Technology Centre &  Network, which provided Funding for Joseph Essandoh-Yeddu from Ghana and Felicia Mogo from Nigeria to attend.

    The aim of the workshop was to develop the first global needs assessment for offshore carbon storage. Its goals included initiating a discussion about the various aspects of offshore transport and storage; building an international community of parties interested in offshore storage; and facilitating countries to identify their specific issues, challenges, and opportunities.

    IMG_5403Topics of interest identified by the attendees included transitioning from pilot project to full-scale deployment; funding and finance; accelerating knowledge and technology transfer; regulatory development; infrastructure; and public engagement. Participants identified and defined synergies, common gaps, and goals in each of these areas, and action items, including future workshops and potential projects, were developed.

    The workshop included two days of keynote addresses, presentations by individual countries, and collaborative discussion. The attendees also took part in a half day Expo that included a tour of a pilot capture facility, a visit to the Bureau of Economic Geology’s core repository, demonstrations, and a poster session.

    IMG_5414-1Summarizing the importance of the workshop, GCCC’s Tip Meckel explained, “this is the first time that we’ve ever had so much international diversity and experience all sitting down with the common goal of figuring out how we can work together to make offshore CCS work. You can either dip your toe into the offshore or take a deep dive. This was a deep dive.”

     

    For a complete report of the workshop, please click here.

     

     

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