Gulf Coast Carbon Center, along with IEAGHG, Bellona, and CCSA, hosted the only official UNFCCC Side Event on CCS at COP-23 as well as an exhibit booth at the event. In keeping with the theme of the host country, Fiji, the side event explored carbon capture and storage, and its relationship to small island developing states.

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Katherine Romanak at UNFCCC COP-23 Photo by IISD/ENB | Angeles Estrada

Speaking before the 150 attendees, GCCC’s Katherine Romanak explained the evolution of experience gained through the SECARB program, a DOE partnership, monitoring geological storage, which gives confidence to CCS technology. She said, “CCS works, and we know how to show that it works.” Romanak related the potential for storing gigatonnes of CO2 in offshore geologic formations and how environmental monitoring at CCS sites provides additional data on the health of local marine ecosystems. She invited countries interested in exploring their potential for offshore CO2 storage to join an initiative that began as a US DOE-led international project through the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum.

Other speakers included, Carol Turley from Plymouth Marine Laboratory, who discussed problems associated with ocean acidification, which results from the combination of carbon dioxide and seawater, and threatens marine communities throughout the globe. Such climate impacts are already having an effect in Trinidad and Tobago, where panel member David Alexander studies the potential for using CCS with ammonia and LNG production.

Mike Monea from the International CCS Knowledge Centre provided an update on the Boundary Dam project and Keith Whiriskey from Bellona outlined the need for infrastructure development to connect CO2 sources to storage sites. Oslo’s Vice-Mayor Geir Lippestad presented an innovative form of CCS using capture from a waste incineration project. Clara Heuberger of Imperial College provided a perspective on using CCS in support of renewables.

IEAGHGs, Tim Dixon, served as chair, setting the scene for the session, giving an update on how the London Convention was amended to allow for offshore CCS as a climate mitigation technology. He commented that, “the session showed why the oceans need CCS, and how it can be done in the perspective of small island states who need to move beyond their first NDCs to decarbonise their industrial sources.”

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Members of the panel “CCS developments towards a 1.5 world; will they help the oceans and Small Island Developing States?” Photo by IISD/ENB | Angeles Estrada

The University of Texas at Austin and Bellona Foundation hosted an exhibit booth on CCS Technology led by Hilary Olson. The IEAGHG, Carbon Capture and Storage Association, and CCS Knowledge also provided interesting information on CCS. A great location, hands-on activities, easy to digest FAQs, and insightful diagrams attracted participants from multiple continents to learn more about this carbon mitigation technology. While many people had ‘heard of’ CCS technology, they did not know the details and were interested to have someone explain the technology and how it could impact CO2 levels.

Official UNFCCC coverage of the side event provided by the International Institute for Sustainable Development can be found here. Side Event presentations are available by searching “7 November” and “enhancing ambition” at this link. The entire side event can be viewed online.

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Katherine Romanak and Tim Dixon speak to interested attendees at the exhibit booth

 

  • This summer, the Gulf Coast Carbon Center is thrilled to work with three outstanding graduate students, Amir Kamali from the University of Oklahoma and Alexander Tarakanov and Mehrdad Alfi from Texas A&M University. Seyyed Hosseini, who is overseeing the students’ research, notes that the interns “have the opportunity to work closely with GCCC staff to learn about CCS related problems and apply their skills to solve them.”

     

    J_5okbroXDwAlexander Tarakanov is in the final year of his Ph. D. in the Department of Petroleum Engineering in Texas A&M University. His research is focused on the Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM), in particular developing LBM-based numerical schemes for simulating fluid flow from pore-scale to field-scale. This summer, Alexander is applying LBM to CO2 sequestration, with a goal of developing code to study the distribution of CO2 in a reservoir.

     

    IMG_8171Merhdad Alfi (left) has a background in chemical engineering and has just finished his third year in Texas A&M University as a Ph. D. student in Petroleum Engineering. At GCCC, Merhdad is working on canister data obtained from shale formations in order to calculate lost gas and formation permeability. He is using an analytical solution to the continuity equation for modelling gas flow inside shale media and then matching it with experimental data gathered from the drawdown process.

     

    Amir Kamali (right) is a Ph. D. candidate whose research involves reservoir geomechanics applied to petroleum and geothermal systems. His bachelors and masters degrees are in petroleum engineering as well. This summer, Amir is developing a transient gas transport model to quantify CO2 and CH4 concentrations at the bottom of the water wells and throughout the wellbore itself.

     

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    Attendees of the International Workshop on Offshore hailed from Europe, Asia, and North America.
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    Tim Dixon of IEAGHG talks to a local reporter during the CarbonSAFE meeting.

    In June, GCCC hosted three events that fostered opportunities for local and international collaboration on geological carbon sequestration in the Gulf Coast.

    Katherine Romanak and Tim Dixon facilitated the Second International Workshop on Offshore Geologic CO2 Storage at the Center for Innovation, Commercialization and Entrepreneurship at Lamar University. Stakeholders from China, South Africa, Japan, Norway, France, the Netherlands, UK, Canada, and across the United States attended. Elements of this event were supported by CSLF. The complete report from the meeting is available.

    Tip Meckel led a field trip that incorporated aspects of the full CCS chain: a tour of the Air Products capture facility, overviews of a midstream transport terminal including rail, vessel and pipeline transport, highlights of modern analogues of storage formations at the Texas coast, and a visit to the museum of the Gulf Coast, Port Arthur Texas.

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    Sue Hovorka describes the Air Products carbon capture project.

    As part of the CarbonSAFE project, the event wrapped up with a workshop and open house exploring the connections and opportunities between carbon sources and sinks in the Gulf Coast hosted by Lamar University. The Department of Energy is supporting the CarbonSAFE project to look at implementing carbon capture and storage technology in the Golden Triangle Area (Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange) of South East Texas.

    GCCC would like to thank Bart Owens of GT-Omniport for generously providing lunch at their facilities on the field trip, Jeff Hayes of Port Arthur for his support for the dinner on Tuesday night, and Tom Neal, the Director at the Museum of the Gulf Coast.

    For more information about the events, please see the story published by the Bureau of Economic Geology and coverage in the Beaumont Business Journal.

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    Jeff Hayes provided dinner during a tour of the Museum of the Gulf Coast in Port Arthur.
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    Tip Meckel with Bart Owens at GT-Omniport who provided lunch at their facilities.
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    Tip Meckel talks with Paul Latiolais, Director of the Center for Innovation and Commercialization at Lamar University.