CSG
 
Texas Tidal Inlets Project: Depositional Environments and Morphodynamics of San Luis Pass
James C. Gibeaut, principal investigator; Tiffany L. Hepner, Rachel Waldinger, William A. White, Rebecca C. Smyth, Roberto Gutierrez, and John R. Andrews
Topographic and bathymetric surveys were completed in the San Luis Pass area, a natural tidal inlet on the southeast Texas coast. The detailed survey data acquired by lidar and ground and echo sounder systems using geodetic GPS positioning will be combined to create a seamless digital elevation model (DEM). The DEM will serve as the base for a geoenvironmental map describing the various depositional environments and associated habitats of the tidal-inlet system.
The Texas General Land Office is funding this study because tidal inlets play a variety of critical roles. They serve as passageways for commercial and recreational vessels, as well as marine life and nutrients. Tidal inlets affect water quality in the coastal bays, and deposition of sediment near inlets forms foundations for intertidal habitats. Inlet processes are also fundamental controls on the littoral sediment budget and, hence, affect shoreline change. Full understanding of coastal erosion problems along the Texas coast must include examination of processes occurring at the 13 open inlets and several more that are periodically open.
Project Information:
Texas Tidal Inlets Project: Depositional Environments and Morphodynamics of San Luis Pass by James C. Gibeaut, Tiffany L. Hepner, Rachel Waldinger,
John R. Andrews, Thomas A. Tremblay, and Thomas Ravens. (PowerPoint presentation)
For more infomation, please contact Jeff Paine. Telephone 512-471-1260;
E-mail jeff.paine@beg.utexas.edu.
October 2003
   
BEG